Eclectic Application of Major Music Education Methods

Elsewhere in this blog I have written about the strengths and weaknesses of Kodaly, Orff, and Gordon approaches to music education. Those articles assumed that it is beneficial to grab strengths from each approach, mixing and matching them into a teaching method that is better than strictly adhering to any one of them. In this … Continue reading Eclectic Application of Major Music Education Methods

Sound Before Sight Is About More Than Teaching Songs

"Sound before sight" is a popular way of saying that music is most effectively taught first aurally, and then by associating what has been learned aurally with visual representations, such as standard music notation. Music Learning Theory and the numerous resources that follow it guide teachers in developing musical literacy according to these principles. Generally, … Continue reading Sound Before Sight Is About More Than Teaching Songs

What Is The Most Effective Way To Teach Rhythm?

Yesterday, I discussed rhythm, defining a rhythm as a group of durations that establishes beat and meter. Once beat and meter are established, then any single duration can be considered a rhythm, because its beat and metric functions are known. Because rhythm needs a beat and metric contextual basis, music teachers should avoid teaching rhythm … Continue reading What Is The Most Effective Way To Teach Rhythm?

The Necessity and Value of Rote Learning in Music

I’ve noticed lately that many music educators view rote learning with disparagement. There are at least two reasons for this. The first is that rote learning in general has fallen into disfavor, and has been taken over by “higher level learning tasks. Constructivists have convinced educators that discovering and constructing knowledge is preferable to memorizing. … Continue reading The Necessity and Value of Rote Learning in Music